Date: April 30, 2017

Mainly cloudy. 40 percent chance of showers late this evening and overnight. A few showers beginning before morning. Risk of a thunderstorm before morning. Wind northeast 30 km/h gusting to 50. Temperature steady near plus 5.

Temp
7.1C

Environment Canada
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Smoking and Tobacco Links

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Smoke-Free Public Outdoor Spaces

This page was reviewed or revised on Thursday, January 26, 2017 9:48 AM

Outdoor smoking bylaws and bans offer protection from exposure to second-hand smoke.

 Smoke-free settings:

  • Prevent youth from starting to smoke
  • Support those who want to quit
  • Help those who quit from starting again
  • Promote positive role modelling for children and youth
  • Eliminate cigarette butts that are poisonous to children, pets and wildlife
  • Reduce litter and protect the environment.

More than 100 communities in Ontario have bylaws beyond the Smoke-Free Ontario Act that protect the public from second-hand smoke in outdoor spaces such as beaches, parks, hospital grounds, bus stops and stadiums.

Smoke-Free Beaches

Smoke-free beaches have many benefits, including the ones listed above. Keeping cigarette butts off beaches also has many additional benefits.

  • Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter in the world, with almost 4.5 trillion butts discarded each year. Cigarette butts take up to 15 years to break down.
  • Cigarette butts pose a threat to the environment and increase fire risk.
  • Butts are toxic and if ingested they can harm wildlife and small children.
  • Toxic chemicals from cigarette butts can leach in to the water.
  • Second-hand smoke can be detected up to 50 feet away from a single cigarette.

For more information visit:

Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation
Smoke-Free Spaces